Mystic Writer

Feeling great: Writing is good for your health

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You are here and reading this blog for one reason only — you love to write. You write because you are imaginative. Because you are creative and thoughtful. You write because you have a story to tell. But, did you ever consider that writing is actually good for your health, too?

health

Flickr: Umberto Salvagnin

It’s true. There are health benefits to writing that have been explored in various studies, including one in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Patients suffering from arthritis and asthma were tasked with writing about a stressful experience. A second group was asked to write about a non-stressful event in their lives.

The findings? The patients who wrote about stressful experiences saw an improvement in their own conditions after four months. Why? Researchers have suggested that the act of writing can serve as a sort of self-healing mechanism.

In fact, one study maintains that people who write about their feelings after being injured can spur healing and improve their overall mood and disposition.

In addition to such benefits, writing can also improve brain function and memory and even help you to effectively think and work your way through traumatic issues in your life. It can serve as a wonderful relaxation tool and self-esteem booster.

Read: Avoid these 6 bad writing habits

So, how can you receive the full benefits of health and wellness through writing?

Read: Tips for writing through depression

First, write regularly. Be sure to write either in your journal or on your memoir or novel at regular intervals throughout the week.

Secondly, write freely. Be open with your feelings. Cast aside your need to be perfect. Don’t worry so much about being published.

Also, write frequently. Don’t limit your choice of time and location for writing. If you don’t have a quiet, solitary place to write, no problem. Write standing up amid the huff and fluster of your busy day.

Finally, write for yourself. Yes, you need to work and get paid. But, by carving out some quality writing time where you delve into the questions and concerns of your own soul, you are making a lifelong investment in your best health.

Kerri S. Mabee is managing editor at EducatedWriter.com and founder of Breeze Media & Communications. Learn more about her at kerrismabee.com.

 

Kerri S. Mabee

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